ScienceIQ.com: Cool science facts delivered daily to your email


 Facts By Category:


 » Physics
 » Astronomy
 » Chemistry
 » Biology
 » Mathematics
 » Geology
 » Engineering
 » Medicine
 » Science

  by keyword search:

    
 ScienceIQ Team:


 »Writers & Editors



xUmp.com
Science Supplies,
Toys & Gifts

PhysLink.com
Physics & Astronomy
Online
Fossil Energy - The Basics


Contrary to what many people believe, fossil fuels are not the remains of dead dinosaurs. In fact, most of the fossil fuels we find today were formed millions of years before the first dinosaurs. Fossil fuels, however, were once alive! They were formed from prehistoric plants and animals that lived hundreds of millions of years ago. Think about what the Earth must have looked like 300 million years or so ago. The land masses we live on today were just forming. There were swamps and bogs everywhere. The climate was warmer. Ancient trees and plants grew everywhere. Strange looking animals walked on the land, and just as weird looking fish swam in the rivers and seas. Tiny one-celled organisms called protoplankton floated in the ocean. When these ancient living things died, they decomposed and became buried under layers and layers of mud, rock, and sand. Eventually, hundreds and sometimes thousands of feet of earth covered them.

In some areas, the decomposing materials were covered by ancient seas, then the seas dried up and receded. During the millions of years that passed, the dead plants and animals slowly decomposed into organic materials and formed fossil fuels. Different types of fossil fuels were formed depending on what combination of animal and plant debris was present, how long the material was buried, and what conditions of temperature and pressure existed when they were decomposing. For example, oil and natural gas were created from organisms that lived in the water and were buried under ocean or river sediments. Long after the great prehistoric seas and rivers vanished, heat, pressure and bacteria combined to compress and 'cook' the organic material under layers of silt.

In most areas, a thick liquid called oil formed first, but in deeper, hot regions underground, the cooking process continued until natural gas was formed. Over time, some of this oil and natural gas began working its way upward through the earth's crust until they ran into rock formations called 'caprocks' that are dense enough to prevent them from seeping to the surface. It is from under these caprocks that most oil and natural gas is produced today. The same types of forces also created coal, but there are a few differences. Coal formed from the dead remains of trees, ferns and other plants that lived 300 to 400 million years ago. In some areas, such as portions of what-is-now the eastern United States, coal was formed from swamps covered by sea water. The sea water contained a large amount of sulfur, and as the seas dried up, the sulfur was left behind in the coal.

419

About the Author


Department of EnergyDepartment of Energy
DOE site is considered public domain. But check on each lab.

Further Reading
Looking at Energy: Fossil Fuels
by Polly Goodman


Related Web Links
The Energy Story
by Energy Quest

Fossil Fuel
by Energy Matters





Home | Privacy Policy

Copyright © 2002-2017 ScienceIQ.com - All Rights Reserved